punish

punish, chastise, castigate, chasten, discipline, correct mean to inflict pain, loss, or suffering upon a person for his sin, crime, or fault.
Punish implies imposing a penalty for violation of law, disobedience of authority, or intentional wrongdoing
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if ye will not... hearken unto me, then I will punish you— Lev 26:18

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American society punishes the ex-Communist who voluntarily repents about as severely as it does the one caught Red-handed— Bliven b. 1889

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Chastise may suggest the infliction of corporal punishment and sometimes implies an acting in anger, but more often with a view to reformation or amendment
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my father hath chastised you with whips, but I will chastise you with scorpions—/ Kings 12:11

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Sometimes chastise implies verbal censure or denunciation
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moral and intellectual weaklings that she felt herself appointed to chastiseTennessee Williams

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and then comes close to castigate which usually implies severe and often public lashing by tongue or pen rather than by whip or rod, and so suggests painful censure or bitter rebuke
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not even the ablest critic can castigate an artless generation into repentance and creative vigor— Barnouw

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Chasten usually implies subjection to affliction or trial with the aim not so much of punishment as of a testing whereby one may emerge humbled and purified or strengthened
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for whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth .... If ye endure chastening, God dealeth with you as with sons— Heb 12:6-7

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such bliss, he tells himself, cannot last forever; fortune must balance it now and then with a chastening blow— Durant

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Discipline (see also TEACH) implies punishment, chastisement, or sometimes chastening, with the intent to subjugate, subdue, or bring under one's control
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the duty of parents to discipline their children

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a thorn in the side of those in authority, his position . . . made it impossible to ignore or effectively to discipline him— Fish

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Correct implies punishment having for its aim the amendment or reformation of the offender
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his faults lie open to the laws; let them, not you, correct him— Shak.

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must moreover know how to correct without wounding— Barzun

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Analogous words: *penalize, fine, amerce, mulct: *imprison, incarcerate, immure: *avenge, revenge
Antonyms: excuse: pardon
Contrasted words: *exculpate, acquit, exonerate, absolve, vindicate

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • punish — [pun′ish] vt. [ME punischen < extended stem of OFr punir < L punire, to punish < poena, punishment, penalty: see PENAL] 1. to cause to undergo pain, loss, or suffering for a crime or wrongdoing 2. to impose a penalty on a wrongdoer for… …   English World dictionary

  • Punish — Pun ish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Punished}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Punishing}.] [OE. punischen, F. punir, from L. punire, punitum, akin to poena punishment, penalty. See {Pain}, and { ish}.] 1. To impose a penalty upon; to afflict with pain, loss, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • punish — pun·ish / pə nish/ vt 1: to impose a penalty on for a fault, offense, or violation 2: to inflict a penalty for the commission of (an offense) in retribution or retaliation or as a deterrent vi: to inflict punishment pun·ish·abil·i·ty /ˌpə ni shə… …   Law dictionary

  • punish — mid 14c., from O.Fr. puniss , extended prp. stem of punir to punish, from L. punire inflict a penalty on, cause pain for some offense, earlier poenire, from poena penalty, punishment (see PENAL (Cf. penal)). Colloquial meaning to inflict heavy… …   Etymology dictionary

  • punish — [v] penalize for wrongdoing abuse, attend to, batter, beat, beat up, blacklist, castigate, chasten, chastise, correct, crack down on*, cuff, debar, defrock, discipline, dismiss, do in, execute, exile, expel, fine, flog, give a going over*, give… …   New thesaurus

  • punish — ► VERB 1) impose a penalty on (someone) for an offence. 2) impose a penalty on someone for (an offence). 3) treat harshly or unfairly. DERIVATIVES punishable adjective. ORIGIN Latin punire, from poena penalty …   English terms dictionary

  • punish — pun|ish [ˈpʌnıʃ] v [T] [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: punir, from Latin punire, from poena; PAIN1] 1.) to make someone suffer because they have done something wrong or broken the law →↑punishment, punitive ↑punitive ▪ Smacking is not an… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • punish — [[t]pʌ̱nɪʃ[/t]] punishes, punishing, punished 1) VERB To punish someone means to make them suffer in some way because they have done something wrong. [V n] I don t believe that George ever had to punish the children... [V n] According to present… …   English dictionary

  • punish — punisher, n. /pun ish/, v.t. 1. to subject to pain, loss, confinement, death, etc., as a penalty for some offense, transgression, or fault: to punish a criminal. 2. to inflict a penalty for (an offense, fault, etc.): to punish theft. 3. to handle …   Universalium

  • punish */*/ — UK [ˈpʌnɪʃ] / US verb [transitive, often passive] Word forms punish : present tense I/you/we/they punish he/she/it punishes present participle punishing past tense punished past participle punished to make someone suffer because they have done… …   English dictionary

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